Tungsten Carbide is a term used to refer to a particular mixture of powdered metals which creates extreme hardness.
The core component is the element Wolfram/Tungsten, which through a special carbonisation process is chemically bound with carbon (WC). WC is a greyish powder.
In order to manufacture the finished carbide a binder is added – typically Co. but for special purposes Ni. is used instead. The binder gives the material ductility.
Carbide comes in a wide range of varied hardness from approx. 700 through 2.000 HV, for the use in metal, wood or stone industry.
In addition to the use of certain binders, the grain size also influences the material’s hardness. Carbide are available today with grain sizes as small as 0,2 microns.